New Zelda Glitch Lets You Get Infinite Arrows

Have you ever run out of arrows in The Legend of Zelda Breath of the Wild?

Oh of course you have. This game gives you a million things to hit with arrows, but you actually have to go and work somewhat to actually find and attain them. It’s not like other Zelda games where you can just cut the grass and hope magic refills pop out.

Fortunately though, it seems you’re in luck. Why? Because as the title suggests, a YouTuber called Austin John has found an interesting trick that will let you farm as many arrows as you like without getting hit! Here’s his video showing off the process:

It’s pretty simple really. Just go to the area marked (with the Bokoblins on horseback), then use Revali’s Gale to fly upwards. Upon landing, keep the camera pointed down so you never see the enemies and well… you don’t get hit by arrows any more. Leaving you free to stand still pressing A to pick up all the arrows falling to the ground nearby.

But why does it happen anyway?

Well, I don’t know for sure. But my best guess is that it’s part of Nintendo being nice to the player. Part of a setup that Nintendo has implemented in a couple of games to avoid players being infuriated by attacks they can’t see.

In other words, the arrows never hit because Nintendo thinks it’s unfair if a projectile is fired at you from off screen without you being able to know where it’s coming from. They know you can’t see the Bokoblins, so they simply have their attacks JUST miss in order to get you moving/make you move the camera into a position where you can easily see and avoid them.

And I believe this because surprisingly, this isn’t the only game where such a tactic works. Oh no, Mario & Luigi Paper Jam did the exact same thing in its papercraft battles. If you can’t see the boss on screen, then the boss can’t hit you at all. Period.

That’s all for the same reason. If you can’t see the boss, having it repeatedly hit you is seen as being cruel to the player. So they simply disabled its attacks until you turned round.

Either way, their kindness is our gain. So go on guys! Go out there and get some more arrows in Zelda Breath of the Wild!

The Disney Afternoon Collection has been Announced!

Ever wanted to play DuckTales, or Darkwing Duck on a modern games console? Feel like the classic adaptations of TaleSpin and Chip ‘n Dale need a revival? Or wanted to see DuckTales 2 finally get out from its predecessors shadow?

If so, it seems like you’re in luck! Because as the title suggests, Disney have just announced The Disney Afternoon Collection for PC, PS4 and Xbox One! Coming on April 18th and available for $19.99, the title includes six great Disney adaptations from the NES era. Aka:

  • Darkwing Duck (NES)
  • DuckTales (NES)
  • DuckTales 2 (NES)
  • TaleSpin (NES)
  • Chip ‘n Dale Rescue Rangers
  • And Chip ‘n Dale Rescue Rangers 2.

In other words, all the classic Capcom video game adaptations of Disney’s old cartoons, all in one convenient package. Here’s a trailer showing the title in action:

What’s more, these games aren’t just a bunch of ROMs slapped on a disc either. Oh no, there are also other neat additions here too. These include a Museum Mode (where you can see concept art for each game), emulator type rewind options and online leaderboards among other things. So if you ever felt like seeing who was best at these classics… well you can do that too.

Time Attack Mode in Chip 'n Dale

Unfortunately, there’s one downside here. What is it?

This collection hasn’t been announced for the Wii U or Nintendo Switch. That’s disappointing really, especially how the originals got popular on a Nintendo platform, and their fans will likely really want to experience these games again in the near future. Add how the Switch is a hybrid system, and well… you can imagine how awesome playing DuckTales on the go would be!

Still, at least the collection exists, and such games are no longer in legal limbo. So if you’re a fan of classic Disney and have a PS4 or Xbox One, go and check it out. It’s definitely something you might miss if you’re not quick enough!

Source:

The Disney Afternoon Collection Revisits Classic Games on April 18th (Official Capcom Blog)

The Kokiri Are Mutated Hylians in the Zelda Series?

Since their debut in Ocarina of Time, the idea behind the Kokiri in the Zelda series has been a pretty simple one. They’re forest spirits created by the Deku Tree. They can’t leave the forest or grow up. And a few hundred years later, it turns out they’ve gotten changed into living tree creatures in order to survive the flood that created the Great Sea.

It’s all standard stuff for the Zelda series really, and most of the fanbase likely know it all by now.


But now it seems Nintendo has different ideas about the origins! Why?

Because according to the new Zelda Encyclopaedia, the Kokiri weren’t originally forest spirits at all.

Oh no, they were actually Hylians. As in, normal humans that entered the forest after running away from civilisation.

Here’s the page about it from the book that confirms it:

As well as a translation about the species via the nice guys at Source Gaming:

ok the Kokiri were originally Hylians who rejected civilization, so they ran into the forests. Then they started their own society and eventually became the Kokiris. It was said if they left the forest they would die, but in reality that was because the Great Deku Tree was holding them back from aging. Once the forest is revived by the sage, and the Deku Tree Sprout is born, the Kokiri could leave the area. In a later era, they worked as the wind sage. (Very loose translation)

As you can see, it’s a pretty drastic departure from their concept back in Ocarina of Time. However, here’s the thing:

It’s also an illogical one. Why?

Well, go back and play Ocarina of Time for a minute. Because if you do, you’ll notice that the game actually says that humans who get lost in the Lost Woods turn into Skull Kids or Stalfos. This is backed up by both a certain Gossip Stone:

They say that when non-fairy folk enter the Lost Woods, they become monsters!

As well as Fado in the Biggoron Sword sidequest:

That guy isn’t here anymore. Anybody who comes into the forest will be lost. Everybody will become a Stalfos. Everybody, Stalfos.

So yeah, it doesn’t really make a lot of sense when you think about it for a moment. But hey, it seems that’s the official viewpoint none the less. That despite lost folk becoming Stalfos or Skull Kids in later years, the original Kokiri folk were actually random Hylian citizens who wandered in the woods and never came out.

It’s a very strange reveal for the Zelda series, and makes you wonder what other crazy things the book will say about the species and their history!

The Making of The Legend of Zelda Breath of the Wild (Official Dev Videos)

Yesterday, Nintendo mentioned that they’d be posting some ‘making of’ videos about The Legend of Zelda Breath of the Wild.

Well, it seems they’ve lived up to that promise. Because here are the videos in question. All of which showcase a different aspect of the game’s development process:

So what’s interesting here?

Quite a few things actually! For starters, the one about the beginning of the game’s development actually states Nintendo has an ‘internal message board system’ which the game’s developers use to discuss ideas they have for the title. Like a sort of Miiverse setup, except for concept art and footage.

This is a pretty neat idea for sharing information about the game, and opens up the (very real) possibility that gaming’s Edward Snowden might have the perfect opportunity to post a bunch of Zelda development docs and concepts online.

And the cool aspects don’t end there. Oh no, they also gave a few details about how the enemies and characters were designed too. For example, did you know the Bokoblins were designed first in this game?

No, me neither. But apparently they were, even though they had some of the most complex AI in the entire experience. So that’s interesting I guess.

As is the talk of how certain sound effects were recorded. For instance, that horn said Blins use to summon backup… is actually a recording of a real horn a staff member owned. So yeah, calling for help through one of those things would actually sound identical to the Bokoblin calls in Breath of the Wild.
Other interesting things revealed are:

  • That the Guardians were based off a staff member’s experiences with the Octoroks in the first game. Apparently he thought they were huge and imposing, so the team designed an enemy kind of based on his conception of the things.
  • How Link’s whole design came about based on his character and personality. In other words, they didn’t design Link and then create his personality, but went the other way around.
  • That part of the game’s concept came from being able to break free of tech limitations limiting the world designs to more linear setups. Interestingly, Skyward Sword is mentioned here, with comments about how they wanted to let players explore the world outside of the bits of the surface you visit in game.

Finally, they made it clear that the game’s development involved revisiting the series conventions and seeing what ones made sense at this point in time. So hey, it seems like the Zelda series is finally breaking away from the traditional formulas of the past and trying something new instead.

So what do you think about the videos? Do they give some interesting insights into Breath of the Wild’s development? Post your thoughts on them here in the comments or over at the Gaming Latest forums today!

My Thoughts on… The Legend of Zelda Breath of the Wild (Part 1)

For the last few days, I’ve been playing the Nintendo Switch version of Zelda Breath of the Wild for a review. It’s been an amazing experience, but given the sheer size and scale of the world, I don’t think I’m quite at the point where I can give a full critique of the game and it’s awesomeness.

Because of this, I’m gonna do something a bit different instead. Namely, give my thoughts on Breath of the Wild in a steadily updating series of articles, until I can eventually get far enough to review the entire game and as much as its content as possible.

So let’s get to it, shall we? Here is part 1 of my thoughts on The Legend of Zelda Breath of the Wild!

Starting with the whole Great Plateau thing. Have to be honest, I kind of wondered why you were limited to this area before actually playing the game. Seems weird for such an open ended title.

But then it struck me: The Great Plateau is basically a disguised tutorial. All the shrines have simple puzzles to teach you how the basics of runes work. The enemies are super weak and easy to avoid (to make it so a new player won’t be overwhelmed). And there’s just the right amount of basic resources to make it survivable but not too punishing.

Either way, with the exception of the Warm Doublet quest, I didn’t have much to note here. And hey, given that the Plateau was shown/available in every single demo/at every event, I’m not sure that’s what others are interested in hearing more about either.

So let’s move on, now to the first interesting aspect of the game.

Namely, the whole ‘upgrade’ system. Basically, you know how in past Zelda games, you got Heart Pieces to increase your health bar?

That doesn’t exist in this one. Instead, every shrine gives you a spirit orb, and you can trade four of them for either a Heart Container or a Stamina Increase.

And that’s where the risk/reward thing comes in. Put simply, you have the choice between playing the game two ways:

  1. Very safely, by putting everything into health at the expense of stamina. This lets you survive more hits (which is useful if you suck at dodging), but also makes exploration a whole lot more annoying than it already can be.
  2. In a risky way, by increasing stamina (hence letting you climb/glide to places more easily), at the expense of basically being a one hit wonder for much of the game. This is convenient for travellers, but also means one Moblin, Guardian, Hinox, Stone Talus or other strong enemy will probably be your last.

I decided to go for another Heart Container.

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