Nintendo Possibly Working with Nickelodeon on New Project?

Well technically it could be based on any video game series produced in the last 30 years. But for whatever reason, people are saying it’s possibly going to be Nintendo one. Like Super Mario Bros or the Legend of Zelda.

Here’s the quote from the official podcast where it’s confirmed:

We have a project now that we’re doing that needs to go unnamed, based on one of the most world famous video games of the last 30 years, that we’ve had in our shop for twelve years with-out being able to get it started. But there were great characters and a great story, and eventually we got it going.

As well as the video itself:

So what do you think? Is this potentially referring to an animated adaptation of a Nintendo franchise? Or could it be based on another video game series of note instead?

Post your thoughts here or on social media now!

The Kunkel Awards are Back!

Last year, the Society of Professional Journalists launched the Kunkel Awards. Designed specifically to cater to gaming journalists, the awards were meant to be a way to reward writers for good gaming journalism, and to lift the negative reputation the field had received over the years.

A noble goal to say the least.

As for how well they actually worked on the other hand… well the jury is still out on that one. The awards certainly went to good articles, but the actual concept itself never really hit the mainstream like it was expected to. No one covered it except for the winners.

But hey, the SPJ has decided to bring them back this year as well! And this time, there are some interesting new award categories to look out for.

Category 1 is the one for ‘best college journalism’, as to encourage a new generation of writers to start writing about video games. Fairly standard stuff, though perhaps kind of necessary given how non diverse the world of gaming journalism is at the moment.

And then there’s category 2. Or, as the SPJ puts it, the one for ‘worst story’.

Oh boy, this is gonna be contentious. Why? Because in a nutshell, it’s basically like the Golden Raspberry Awards/Razzies for gaming journalism. The winner is the most unethical, poorly written article related to video games. Like say, the ones listed in my article here.

Either way, based on how a lot of journalists handle criticism now (by whining about it on Twitter), I can see the nominations and results here going ‘viral’. Or at least, causing one hell of a fight on various social media sites.

Still, it’s necessary in today’s world of ‘fake news’ and poorly researched articles. And hey, maybe it’ll kill the whole ‘rush stories out as quickly as possible without fact checking’ trend that’s become so popular recently.

But what do you think? Are you interested in the Kunkel Awards returning? Is the idea of an award for worst story a good one? Post your thoughts on the matter at the Gaming Reinvented forums or on social media today!

Source:

Kunkel Awards Official Announcement (SPJ website)

The Worst Gaming Journalism of 2016

As you probably know by now, gaming journalism… does not have a good reputation. It’s seen as corrupt, filled with obvious clickbait and flooded to the brim with articles based on questionable rumours from sources with absolutely no evidence behind it. Admittedly, that may or may not be a fair assessment of the field. But it’s definitely how the public think of it, for better or worse.

Yet as bad as the reputation may be, there are some examples of ‘journalism’ that well and truly live up to it. These include articles and videos based on questionable rumours, obvious clickbait made to attract pageviews from angry people and all manner of other things besides.

And so here they are. Here are the worst examples of gaming journalism in 2016!

12. SJW Says Super Mario Run is ‘Sexist’ Because She’s Captured in Super Mario Run

So let’s start this party with a bit of a bang. Or in this case, a delusional moron who’s never played Super Mario Run complaining that Peach being kidnapped is ‘sexist’ for the two hundred and fifty millionth time.

https://archive.fo/yrudB

Of course, what makes it all more hilariously bad are the complaints brought up here. Oh no, she’s baking a cake instead of DJ-ing at a party! That’s a sexist stereotype!

No really, that’s actually from the article. As are comments about how the series should be ‘restructured’ to appeal to young girls. Because apparently Super Mario 3D World, Mario & Luigi Paper Jam and various other games where Peach is either an independent character or outright playable don’t exist, do they?

And to put the final nail in the coffin, this is in regards to Super Mario Run. You know, a game where…
Peach actually IS a playable character! No really, you unlock her as a playable character complete with floating ability after playing a bit of Toad Rally.

So not only is the article painfully outdated and cliché with its content, but it was clearly written by someone who’d played four minutes of Kingdom Tour and assumed Peach was only a damsel in distress. Hooray for thorough research there guys!

11. Destructoid Says Minecraft Billionaire ‘Feels Oppressed by Women’

But hey, at least Super Mario Run is sort of relevant news. Cause this Destructoid article (about an argument between Notch and Jennifer Scheurle on Twitter) really isn’t:

https://archive.fo/R2ar0

Basically, the latter posted a picture of a statue and said it was ‘Mansplaining: the statue’, then Notch followed it up with a comment about mansplaining being a sexist term and a joke involving the non word ‘cuntfusing’ some time afterwards.

Fair enough. It’s your usual back and forth between someone with more left wing political views and someone with more right wing political views. Like the other two hundred times it’s occurred on Twitter by now.

Which means it’s not newsworthy. Even if one guy was the creator of Minecraft and the other one was a game designer.

But no, they ran with it. What a pointless article to run on an otherwise respected website.

10. Polygon Tries to Play Doom

But hey, onto something a bit light-hearted now. Namely, Polygon’s absolutely terrible attempt at showcasing the 2016 version of Doom. Here it is, if you haven’t seen it:

It’s pretty obvious that whoever is filming this cannot play the game to save their life. Seriously, even the simple tasks of moving out of the way of enemy fire and not falling off cliffs while trying to shoot opponents seems to be beyond the person holding the controller.

Now admittedly, that’s not an uncommon thing for gaming videos. After all, if you ever saw people trying to play Mario Kart Wii before its release date, it was just one big cringey train wreck filled with karts and bikes flying off the road at every opportunity. And every Pokemon game seemingly gets recorded by an awful lot of gaming journalists and YouTube celebrities who clearly don’t have the slightest clue how the game mechanics work.

But here’s the thing:

Most of those were done by either one man bands or people whose jobs didn’t specifically involve playing games.
Polygon on the other hand, has a team of staff. Of which most of them likely have different interests and game genres they’re good at.

So here, someone who’s played an FPS before should probably have taken the reigns. That way, the video would have shown how the game actually works (aka when played by someone with any interest at all in the genre) and the site’s reputation wouldn’t have dropped even harder the minute the video hit the internet.

Still, it’s a simple mistake to make.

9. Metro Assumes Niantic is Making Harry Potter GO

Which is more than you can say about this one. Where the Metro newspaper is saying that Niantic is working on Harry Potter GO:

http://archive.is/8o5G2

Sounds good, right?

Well, no. Because there’s just one snag here.

They’re not making Harry Potter GO. The original news story was from a questionable site (which might be rightfully classed as ‘fake news’) that ended up being debunked by Snopes.

And that’s not all! Because you see, they never bothered doing the research or actually looking at where the story came from. Instead, they found a random online gossip blog (which then quoted the fake site), and took their word as gospel. Great work guys! Not only did you not look up whether your source was a reliable one, but you never bothered to look up whether THEIR source was reliable as well!

Just goes to show you how much ‘research’ goes into news reporting this days…

Continue Reading…

Wario was Meant to be German?

With Mario and Luigi being Italian American, it would be quite reasonable to assume Wario and Waluigi were the same. After all, they’ve got similar names. They’re all voiced by Charles Martinet. And hey, even some of their friends and enemies from their own games are Italian in origin!

But did you know this wasn’t originally the case?

That Wario was actually meant to be German?

No, I’m not kidding. The original concept for Wario (in the days of the Game Boy and N64) was that he was going to be a German character rather than an Italian or Italian American one. It’s why his Mario Party 1 voice actor wasn’t Martinet at all, but German actor Thomas Spindler.

Who in a recent YouTube comment said:

This is 100% correct. Wario speaks German: he says (or rather, *I* say) ‘So ein Mist!’ The recording was done in a studio of the former Nintendo head office in Kyoto (not the new Nintendo premises in Kamitobaguchi), under the direction of Mr. Takashi Tezuka. Back then, I worked on the script for another Nintendo project with my French friend and colleague Julien Bardakoff (who voiced Toad/Kinopio). My company T.S. Word Co.Ltd. also translated and edited the German script for Star Fox which can be verified in the credits of Star Fox 64. The concept behind Wario was that of a German character and those responsible for the voice-overs at Nintendo back then intended him to speak German. I hope that this resolves the issue once and for all.

This may explain a few things about his portrayal in that era. Like say, his very different voice style to Mario and Luigi in the older games…

How this ‘doh I missed’ comment is actually meant to be the German phrase ‘So ein mist!’ (aka ‘Aw darn’):

Or (and this is probably a bit of a stretch), Waluigi’s own design as well. Maybe the Dick Dastardly similarities weren’t a complete coincidence there (remember what side Dastardly was on in his own second series of cartoons).

And while most of it got dropped when Martinet took over Wario’s voice in the Mario spinoffs, there’s even a bit of a German influence in Wario’s portrayals up to this day. For example, just tell me his theme from Mario Strikers Charged doesn’t sound like German folk music:

So yeah, seems Next Level Games wanted to provide a shout out to Wario’s roots as well. Guess even recent games haven’t completely forgotten about the original intentions for the character!

But hey, what do you think about this? Are you surprised that Wario was going to be a German character at one point? Or did you kind of realise this after hearing him in action in Mario Party 1?

Post your thoughts here in the comments below!

Source:

Wario Was Intended to be German? (Wario Forums)

Nintendo Switch Presentation Coming January 12th!

Want to learn a bit more about the Nintendo Switch? Feel like you need another couple of trailers to tide you over till March?

If so, you’re in luck! Because as announced by Nintendo earlier today, a new presentation is being aired at 8PM PT on the 12th of January 2017! Here’s the official announcement straight from the Nintendo Twitter page:

It’s not the best timing as far as European Nintendo fans are concerned (UK gamers had better get up at 4 in the morning if they want to watch this), but hey, it works well for everyone else. Can’t complain about a few more video game trailers or console details, right?

But what do you think? Are you going to watch the presentation when it’s aired this January? Or will you just be waiting for other gaming sites and communities to cover it instead?

Post your feelings on the matter at the Gaming Reinvented forums or on social media today!